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Archive for the ‘Katahdin sheep’ Category


As I mentioned in the last post, I had hoped to keep these ewes for many years to come- but sadly, we are selling our flock.  This is the Perfect opportunity for someone getting started, or anyone who wants to add true quality to an existing program.  August 1, 2016 we put an RR ram with the flock, so they could start lambing as early as January 2017. There is a lot more information about these ewes in the pervious post.  Please take the time to look around the blog. If you are interested, please send an email to cadiepruss@yahoo.com

We are also selling 2 adult Kangals (Livestock guard dogs).  They are both spayed and both 3 years old.

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Happy 2016!   I am really looking forward to our lambing season this year.   In 2015 we decided to keep only RR ewes and lambs.  We had a lot of really beautiful and productive QR ewes and we were proud to offer them for sale to other breeders.  Mike and I have always had strict selection criteria including good mothering skills, milk production, rate of gain of lambs, ability to thrive on pasture, and worm resistance.  Every year we cull animals that do not meet our criteria, and we don’t sell them to others for breeding.

In 2015 we decided that we were going to add one new criteria- RR.  In years past we had to have all lambs born to a QR ewe tested.   We have only used RR rams since 2005 so we have not had any QQ animals for a decade, but we have kept QR ewes that otherwise met our criteria.

Every year we also have a few that we need to cull because they have lost their ear tags.  That always makes me so frustrated.  We have 2 ear tags- one small brass one that we put in at birth, and the larger plastic one.  They go in opposite ears.  Frequently a sheep will only lose one, but if they lose them both, we can’t use them in our registered flock anymore.  That is the worst way to cull your flock.

Because we cut down to 22 ewes and lambs, and we really liked this flock, we decided we were going to put an end to culling due to lost ear tags.  We microchipped each of them and GUESS WHAT !!!!   Last week, when we brought them off the pastures to vaccinate and bring in the barn, one ewe had lost BOTH ear tags.  She had them in the summer when we did the microchipping.  If only one animal is missing ear tags, it is easy to figure out who they are, but more than one- and they are doomed.  Now, because I was able to scanner her and verify who she is, I can purchase a replacement tag.   I am so happy we did this.  I hope to have these ewes for a very long time.

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ALL HAVE BEEN SOLD!!!

We only use RR rams, so all of our ewes are at least QR.  We are a pasture based farm and do not feed grain

We have 13 registered ewes- some are known RR.

We have 6 ewes that have lost their identification ear tags- so we are selling them as commercial ewes.

email cadiepruss@yahoo.com

cap 700 CAP509_CAP771 For Sale For Sale3 For Sale4 outstandingForSale outstandingForSale2untagged untagged_2

We also have 2 rams for sale.

CAP 480 is a 5 year old RR registered ram.  He has done great for us and now he is ready for a new opportunity.

CAP 747 is a 2015  RR ram that was born as a twin whose mother had lost her ear tag- so he is being sold as a commercial ram.

CAP480_2015 CAP747_RR_2

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CAP 480

CAP 480

CAP 480

CAP 480

NDS 07 668

NDS 07 668

These rams are GRASS FED ONLY!  NO GRAIN for these guys. 

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Katahdin hair sheep shedding- early may

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The best shape for grazing? rectangular!  Show animals are high on leg and tubular in body- but long legs just mean long necks (or they can’t reach the forages).  There are a lot of articles, and Gerald Fry has made a name for himself studying the efficiencies of grazing animals.   It turns out- the “folk art” pictures had it right- large rectangular bodies, short legs, short necks.

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